How to Evaluate Your Own Doll 

Before 

Entering It in Competition


Before starting to china paint your reproduction, you really did research this particular type of doll thoroughly. You eliminated the photos and drawings of similar reproduction dolls that are not correct and kept the best photo to be used as a study for your special antique reproduction doll. What book did you choose to follow, or was it a Theriault calendar, or perhaps another source? Be certain to attach this information to your doll’s wrist when entering her into competition, as it helps the judge evaluate your workmanship more accurately. Sometimes there are several versions of the same doll and no judge can be expected to know all of them For instance, Mein Leibling: there are at least five versions of her in different books. Steiners are another perfect example, with very few of them being painted the same.

CLEANING:

CHINA PAINTING:

OVERALL WASH:

CHEEK BLUSH:

EYELASHES:

EYEBROWS:

MOUTH:

ACCENTS:

EARS:

EYES:

STRINGING:

HAIR:

COSTUME:

NOTE: THIS PARAGRAPH IS ONLY FOR PEOPLE WHO REALLY WANT TO WIN THAT TOP AWARD: 

SHOES:

ACCESSORIES:

When you have finished evaluating your own doll, you should have come within five points of the judge’s evaluation. If you have used the correct studies when painting your beautiful reproduction doll, and dressed her accordingly, you should be in the 90’s and earn a blue ribbon. Even if you never put your doll into a competition, completing this exercise makes you look at your doll in a completely different light. You will see your mistakes, and, hopefully, will not repeat them on the next doll.

A NOTE ON ENTERING COMPETITIONS:

Entering competitions gives you a chance to evaluate where your dollmaking skills stand at any given point in time. You must remember that you are getting the personal opinion of one or two individuals at that time. You may not agree with the judge’s opinion, or her comments, but you have put your doll in the competition to get that score sheet and its comments. You should take those comments and examine them to see what judges are looking for. The judges see many different dolls in many different competitions, so you are really seeing how your doll stacks up against all the dolls the judge has looked at, because that is what she has based her opinions on. Sometimes your doll will be judged by an inexperienced judge. That is unfortunate, but it is part of the game. Sometimes the judge may have an off day (wrong time of the month!). That, too, is unfortunate. However, it is only that one judge, on that one day, and it doesn’t mean that your doll is any less than perfect if it doesn’t win the competition. The important thing to remember at all times is that competition is part of the learning experience as we try to improve our dollmaking skills in search of the "perfect" doll. We must never lose sight of the fact that we do this art for the fun and enjoyment that we get out of seeing a finished doll in all its glory. One of the most beneficial things about competition is that it sets a deadline, and from that deadline we do, in fact, end up with a completely FINISHED doll.

HAPPY DOLLMAKING!!


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Evelyn


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  This page last edited on September 18th, 2014.

   


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